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Showing posts from May, 2019

Raising Reading Achievement

This year my inquiry is focussed on accelerating my students reading progress. I am really enjoying this focus and I feel that I have set up my class well - they understand my expectations and they are rising to the challenges that I am presenting them with.

For my learners who are reading below their biological age, I am focussing on mileage and being able to summarise what they are reading. I am assigning two journal articles a week (with one joint create activity) to achieve this. In term 1 our focus was understanding texts at a literal level, but this term we are beginning to focus more on evaluating the text and making inferences. These students also need to develop their vocabulary so that they can comprehend increasingly challenging texts. I have used reciprocal reading to ensure that my students are discussing new vocabulary, the ideas presented within a text and that they are consistently summarising chunks of texts.



For my student reading above their biological age, mileage …

Making magic with Google Draw

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While it is easy to get carried away with a range of apps, extensions and sites when you are a digital teacher, it is important not to focus more on a cool tool than your lesson content. In the spirit of this, Clarelle and I decided to run a session about Google Draw, to show how one simple tool can be used to do a range of things.

This was a really fun session to run - it started off with us talking about the things that we use all the time, like sketchnoting, annotating, hyperdocs (or hyperdraws). We then looked at some of the more artistic things that you can do with Google Draw, I had a lot of fun with this part, but it wasn't for everyone!

We also went through some of the tips about how to use Google Draw. Some of them were really basic, such as changing the size of the Google Draw, but they are still really useful to know!

Sticky Learning with Hyperdocs

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When I used to think about Hyperdocs, I immediately imagined a page filled with hyperlinks. After a session with hyperdoc guru Lisa Highfill, I realise that I may have been wrong about them, in fact, they are not so different from the type of slides that I have been creating for my own learners.

The docs and slides that Lisa creates have a definite structure, they clearly take the students on a journey, which for me would look like 'learn, create, share', while for Lisa this might look more like 'explore and explain'. The slides have short instructions and they use images and a layout that is visually appealing.

The other misconception that I had about hyperdocs was the number of links that they would feature. Yes, student choice is wonderful, but nobody likes to be bombarded with links as this can become overwhelming. I was pleasantly surprised with the number of links that Lisa's slides provided; the links were purposefully chosen and took students to engaging bu…